first amendment defense in trademark case

Honey Badger Case Shows Limits of First Amendment Protection in Trademark Cases

A recent Ninth Circuit decision, Gordon v. Drape Creative, Inc. (2018), involving two well-known “Honey Badger” trademarks, shows the limits of the First Amendment defense in trademark cases. 

Parties that seek to use trademarks in creative ways would be well advised to consider its facts when determining whether to proceed or risk legal exposure.

Federal courts have adopted a special set of rules for trademark infringement cases involving expressive content, which, for First Amendment reasons, makes it harder for a trademark owner to enforce its rights when the accused use involves expressive content, such as the title or content of movies, video games, etc.  The test originates in Rogers v. Grimaldi (2d Cir. 1989), but has most often been applied by the Ninth Circuit in a long line of cases. 

The Honey Badger case, however, involved very minimal creativity – the mark was used on greeting cards with virtually no embellishment, and it appears that there was a deliberate intent to exploit the mark.  The Ninth Circuit reversed a grant of summary judgment for the defendant, finding that there was an issue for trial as to whether the mark was used in a way that was “explicitly misleading as to [the] source or content” of the product. 

The Gordon opinion is helpful in understanding the limits of the First Amendment defense in these types of cases.