luxury goods lawyer

LVMH’s Kenzo Sued by Levi Strauss Raises Issues of When There Is Confusion

A recent trademark suit brought by Levi Strauss against Paris luxury house Kenzo raises interesting questions of trademark infringement and when use of a product design may infringe upon another’s design trademark.

On March 20, 2018 Paris luxury house Kenzo, owned by LVMH, introduced a new line of jeans, shorts, and overalls named the Kenzo Britney Spear line.  This line bears a pocket-tab with the word KENZO.  Shortly thereafter, Kenzo was sued for trademark infringement by the famous jeans maker Levi Strauss. Levi Strauss’ core claim is that it owns trademark rights in a pocket-tab design, and Kenzo is infringing those rights by selling apparel items that have a very similar tab. 

Court Allows Forever 21’s Second Amended Complaint Against Gucci to Proceed

In a prior post, we discussed Forever 21’s lawsuit against Gucci in federal court in Los Angeles, seeking to cancel Gucci’s registrations for its Blue-Red-Blue and Green-Red-Green striped marks, and for a declaration that its clothing and accessory products that incorporate similar striping are not infringing. 

As we noted there, the suit raises many issues of trademark law around Gucci’s rights in these designs. Among the issues of Gucci’s rights in the designs include whether the designs function as trademarks; whether they have achieved sufficient recognition and association with Gucci exclusively; and whether the designs are “aesthetically functional,” meaning that there is a competitive need to permit their use by others. 

The issues of infringement raised by the case include whether Gucci will be able to establish consumer confusion, either at the point of sale or in the post sale context, whether Forever 21’s house mark dispels confusion, and whether there is a claim for trademark dilution.  The complexity of the issues stems from the fact that trademark rights are not the right to exclude others from use of a word or symbol, but the right to prevent consumer confusion or deception. 

Are you a Trademark Bully? How to Avoid Being and Being Labelled As One

Trademark Bully.  A label often used to characterize a trademark owner by targets of enforcement efforts. 

Sounds bad – conjures up images of a powerful, large corporate entity trying to crush the little guy. Congress even asked the Trademark Office to research and prepare a report about it.  As a defense to enforcement efforts by trademark owners, some targets of enforcement efforts have taken to social media to attempt to generate negative publicity against trademark owners. 

A trademark bully is a trademark owner who uses its trademark right to harass and intimidate another business beyond what the law might be reasonably interpreted to allow.  It does not mean big vs. little – to the contrary, big trademark owners are often expected and even required to be the most aggressive in enforcing their rights.

In this post, we consider how to assess whether an enforcement action is reasonable, how to avoid being labelled a “bully,” and how to fight back against such a charge.

Vuitton Win Against LVL XIII Highlights Fashion Startup Challenges in Protecting Their Designs

Louis Vuitton scored a win against start-up sneaker manufacturer LVL XIII, when a federal appeals court affirmed dismissal of the latter’s trade dress suit against Vuitton.  The case illustrates the difficulty of protecting new designs, particularly for small fashion and luxury goods startups. 

LVL XIII asserted “trade dress” rights in its design of a metal plate at the sneakers’ toe-end – meaning that the design functions as its trademark by identifying the sneakers as it brand.  But such claims require a strong showing of consumer association – that the public identifies the design with a single brand owner.  That takes time and significant investment of resources to promote and market the design.  

As LVL XIII learned to its chagrin, until a high level of consumer association is reached, others are free to copy.  And, the very act of copying by others takes away from exclusivity in the design, which can destroy any chance of reaching the required consumer association.  This can be especially challenging to small design companies.

Design companies need a strategy for protection.  They should consider using additional forms of intellectual property to protect the designs.  These rights include design patents and copyright, neither of which require a showing of consumer recognition.  That then allows time for the company to build up consumer recognition in the design and gain trade dress rights.

Distinct Points-of-Novelty Test for Design Patents Ends

Four years ago we wrote about the rising importance of design patents to the fashion and luxury goods communities and the increasing prevalence of design patents as the subject of litigation.   At that time, in order to prevail on a claim of design patent infringement, a plaintiff was required to satisfy two tests: (1) the ordinary observer test, and (2) the points of novelty test.  For over two decades patent holders and accused infringers have complained that the points of novelty test was unworkable. 

Responding to the complaints, the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit (CAFC) recently abolished that test and ushered in a new era of design patent law.  Egyptian Goddess, Inc. v. Swisa, 543 F.3d 665 (Fed. Cir. 2008).